• 0

    posted a message on MCMap Live - Simple, Fast Minecraft Mapping for Mac OS X
    Yes, that's what I did (and also using 1.5.5). The app you just posted runs but stays at the "white boxes" stage of loading, never drawing any terrain. Maybe it's not compatible with OSX 10.7.5?
    Posted in: Minecraft Tools
  • 0

    posted a message on MCMap Live - Simple, Fast Minecraft Mapping for Mac OS X
    When I try to run the mcmap executable directly it returns instantly with "Segmentation fault: 11". Guess I'll have to compile it myself.
    Posted in: Minecraft Tools
  • 0

    posted a message on MCMap Live - Simple, Fast Minecraft Mapping for Mac OS X
    Is anyone else having trouble with bobotheclown_gti's download? I tried it and when I try to open a world the application crashes.
    Posted in: Minecraft Tools
  • 0

    posted a message on Minecraft Cosmology
    Quote from Kourebos

    People have been to the Farlands using different teleportation tools (and a very few have spend tens of thousands of hours actually walking there/flying there in creative). What happens is the world continues but the physics becomes weird (for instance you pass through solid blocks and sometimes terrain generation can mess up) and then the game eventually crashes.


    I'm imagining that somewhere past the crash zone is the edge of the cube-face.
    Posted in: Discussion
  • 0

    posted a message on Minecraft Cosmology
    Quote from Kourebos

    Actually with a cube world (and living on only one side of the cube) there would be no, "land of eternal twilight". The far north and south side of the Minecraftian surface would have the same day/night cycle as the middle regions.

    True, but I was specifically talking about not living on only one face of the cube - there are 4 faces with the normal day/night cycle and then two faces, the top and bottom, which are in eternal twilight.
    Posted in: Discussion
  • 0

    posted a message on How do you envision the Minecraft world from Space?
    I started a thread about this and related topics about a month ago. (I think it's a big cube.)
    Posted in: Discussion
  • 0

    posted a message on How do you name your worlds?
    I rename mine once I have a sense of what's going on there. When we got the ability to rename saves, I renamed my old worlds Old Underhill (all my houses were in caves) and Towerview (many towers connected by skybridges and tunnels). When I started my current world it was "New World" but there were two nearby deserts and I found both Lapis Lazuli and Diamond under my house before closing the game, so it was immediately renamed "Blue Sands".
    Posted in: Discussion
  • 0

    posted a message on Minecraft Cosmology
    Some great theorizing by Kimundi! Wonderful! "MCU" and "Catoms" are very useful terms.

    I was pondering the question of knocking blocks out of the worldgrid, and realized that different blocks hold on to the grid not only to different degrees but in different ways. In some cases particular tools are needed to attack the grid without damaging the block. And if stone is the higher-energy form of cobblestone, it loses extra energy when it is unbound which must be put back in through a furnace.

    I like the idea of conscious minds providing force spreading through the grid (though I don't know if it needs to be a different grid than the primary worldgrid). It's not just minds that can knock things out of the grid, though: water will pop torches, and light and darkness will pop mushrooms and flowers.

    The idea of separate gridbound and unbound forms explains things like chests, furnaces, etc. as they store and act on the unbound form, which is how the material for an entire house can fit into a 1m3 box. Stacking limits must also be a property of the unbound forms - perhaps some kind of exclusion principle.
    Quote from Revae

    If gravity is all grid based, then why do the stars orbit in a circle, and the arrows fly in arcs?

    Quote from Kimundi

    Well, my current theory is that the world, sun, moon and stars are all part of a fixed grid, the World itself just happens to rotate around its WE-axis. On the World itself, there IS Gravity, but it can easily be nilified by the Gridforce.

    I think you could make the case that thrown objects are transitioning from the grid of the player's arm to the worldgrid.
    Quote from Kimundi

    @yomikoma While I think it is only logical to asume a Cubical World, the facts do in fact point to a flat World: Sun and Moon rotate around the centre of the 128m high explorable world slice, instead of some point 32,000,000m below it.

    How can you tell? I think the only evidence would be parallax, seeing the moon or sun move against the background of stars, and we don't know how far away anything is. If we saw parallax between the north and south Far Lands but not between morning and night, that would be evidence for the flat world.
    Posted in: Discussion
  • 0

    posted a message on Maybe minecraft really is curved.
    Quote from sand500

    1) The Stars
    We could look at the stars and note down the constellations we see, then we could move a vast distance and look at the sky again, if some of the constellations are not there, and others are, then this must mean that some constellations are out of our view and some others moved in.

    This would be a good experiment to run - though it would only work in the north and south. Anyone feel like getting a picture of the northern-horizon and southern-horizon stars from the center, the northern Far Lands, and the southern Far Lands? If minecraft is curved, that's where we'd expect to see a difference. Ideally you'd do it at midnight in all cases to remove variance, and you'd want to be at height 128 so the Wall wouldn't obscure the horizon.
    Posted in: Discussion
  • 0

    posted a message on Minecraft Cosmology
    In this thread, sand500 brings up the issue of the direction of gravity. In our universe, gravity pulls toward the center of mass of the body involved. This would mean that visitors to the Far Lands would be pulled slightly back towards (0,0) and would feel like they are walking slightly uphill when they move away from the center and downhill when they come back. To my knowledge this doesn't happen. My theory is that gravity is constrained to following one of the 3 axes of the prevailing grid.

    What happens at the edges of the cube? I think there are two possibilities. One is that gravity simply pulls in whatever direction is straighter. That would mean that there would be a diagonal plane stretching out from the corner, separating two gravity fields that differ from each other by 90 degrees:
    vvv/
    vv/<
    CC<<
    CC<< 

    The other possibility is that gravity only applies when you are directly in one of the cardinal directions from the body in question, and is zero otherwise - large bodies cast six gravity shadows out into space :
    vv00
    vv00
    CC<<
    CC<< 

    (Hopefully my diagrams are clear.) I don't think there's any way to tell which interpretation is correct but to me, the second one seems Minecraftier somehow.
    Posted in: Discussion
  • 0

    posted a message on Maybe minecraft really is curved.
    Quote from sand500

    2) Gravity
    Gravity pulls towards the center of a mass. in a sphere, gravity pulls towards the center, in a flat plane, gravity will pull toward the center of the plane (like the center of a piece of paper). So, if where ever you travel, the gravity is pulling down(relative to Steve) then the World of Minecraft must be a sphere. But if gravity pulls in wierd angles (relative to Steve), then minecraft is flat (If you were close to the edge of a piece of paper, the center of the paper would not be directly under you)

    I think you really skip a step here - you're assuming that gravity works the same way in the Minecraft universe as in our universe, though you've seen floating stone blocks. There's no evidence that it pulls directly toward the center of mass of large bodies, and without that point 2 is void. (This is a good reminder to discuss the direction of gravity in the Minecraft Cosmology thread, thank you :smile.gif: )
    Posted in: Discussion
  • 0

    posted a message on Minecraft Cosmology
    You're right, WhisperingSiren. It seems like conscious life is some kind of catalyst for natural processes - time still passes without us (the sun and moon keep moving in SMP when nobody's logged in) but even things like liquid flow and lava setting things on fire need a nearby presence. In Minecraft, a tree can't even fall down in the forest without someone to hear it! (Or burn down, since trees don't fall... :smile.gif: )
    Posted in: Discussion
  • 0

    posted a message on Minecraft Cosmology
    Quote from Jacooo

    Yeah, that's basically what I was trying to say :wink.gif:
    I even had that sand/gravel idea in my head, but couldn't express it very well.
    Progress. But what comes next? Will there be another 'Update'? Or...

    We still have to resolve why the world-cube, which isn't staying aligned with either grid, isn't falling into the sun.
    Posted in: Discussion
  • 0

    posted a message on Minecraft Cosmology
    I'm liking this train of thought. I think it could be simplified though. The general rule is "if it doesn't fit perfectly into the secondary grid, it falls." This accounts for falling mobs, items, and liquids. For sand and gravel, we can say that they're made up of unconnected particles, so no single piece fills the grid perfectly. (They don't fall over because the particles are perfect cubes and stacked on top of each other.) When you pack sand together into sandstone, it becomes a single object that fills the grid and thus doesn't fall.

    Since there are some non-falling blocks that don't totally fill the basic grid (like slabs, fences, farmland, liquid sources) this non-gravity grid must be smaller - maybe 1/8 or 1/16 of the main grid size. I can even imagine how Ghasts could fly, by having internal organs that latch on and off of the smaller grid.
    Posted in: Discussion
  • 0

    posted a message on Minecraft Cosmology
    Oh, this is such an excellent post, qlmmb2086. :GoldBar: :Diamond: :GoldBar: :Diamond: :GoldBar: :Diamond: :GoldBar: :Diamond: :GoldBar: :Diamond: Grids being the Minecraft counterpart of gravity wells makes so much sense. And boxiness as a result of the laws affecting electrons is very well thought out. Great job!
    Posted in: Discussion
  • To post a comment, please .