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    posted a message on Minecraft BOREDOM
    Everyone gets in a rut while playing sometimes. I know I have. The key is finding something new that you really want to try. Asking or looking around the forums is a great way to do it.
    Posted in: Survival Mode
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    posted a message on My Pyramid :D
    LONG LIVE THE PENTAGRAM!

    Plus it looks pretty sweet. If only you could get skeletons to spawn around it. Or zombies. Not :SSSS: though.
    Posted in: Screenshots
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    posted a message on [DESIGN CHALLENGE] unbreakable vault (now in testing!!!)
    I have been wondering this too, and the only way I can get around it is through the use of spawn points and nether portals. It works like this. The vault is made out of an entirely bedrock cube. The ONLY openings are two (more if you like) single chests laid two spaces apart in the bottom of the wall allowing the chests to be opened from the inside and outside of the vault. If destroyed, the holes still do not allow access inside. When a player wants to enter the vault, he or puts all of the items in their inventory into these boxes. The player then must kill themselves. As a moderator, a hack must be used to change the player's spawn somewhere inside the cube. So, upon death, they will teleport into the cube and be able to retrieve the contents of the boxes from the inside.

    Getting out requires use of the nether-gate glitch discussed here: viewtopic.php?f=1016&t=75218 A gate is set up in the entry way outside the cube where the boxes are loaded. Upon first entry to the nether, the connection is made. Then, a second portal must be made just inside the cube which (as close as possible to the original), given proximity of the portals, it becomes likely that they will both travel to the same gate in the nether. Then, upon exiting the nether once again, the nether portal will only deposit the player outside the cube, thus creating a one way path.

    Disclaimer: I'm not terribly familiar with the inner workings of server moderators, so I'm not sure if the spawn point idea or the portal concept will apply to multiplayer. If it does, it would be effective. If not, it would be fun to create in singleplayer, but ultimately, as stated above, useless.

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    Posted in: Survival Mode
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    posted a message on The Fed - Regulate your Minecraft Economy!
    Quote from RS14 »


    What you don't seem to be clearly explaining is why a rational player would ever accept gold in exchange for anything. "To trade with others" doesn't count, seeing as they don't want it either.




    Narcisism is correct. Its value is based only on faith, a faith that if one player accepts gold as payment for goods/services, then others will. A couple of examples:

    Example 1: A veteran SMP player wants to build a new courtyard in his castle floored entirely with tree stump blocks. It would require several stacks of wood and this veteran player is rich, having mined the hillside diligently for a while. Rather than spending several minecraft days wandering around and cutting down trees, he would rather cut out all that work and simply pay someone to do it for him. (And thus a class system is born, but more on that in another thread) So he travels down to the village where he meets a new player and says "If you bring me twenty stacks of stumps :Logs^: I will pay you ten gold bars." (This value is purely arbitrary for the purpose of the example) The newcomer agrees and later delivers 20 stacks of stumps. (to reply to an earlier post, a trading mod would be ideal) The veteran pays hims, takes his stumps and builds his courtyard. The newcomer then, ten gold richer, now goes to town a finds a player willing to sell diamonds. He buys a diamond for nine gold bars and is thus able to finally make his first diamond pickaxe. The diamond seller, in turn, takes the gold from that sale and others and then pays for other supplies. And thus the cycle continues

    Example 2: A rich but naive player of minecraft wants to build a secret locking mechanism for his house, but doesn't have the knowledge of Redstone to do it. Rather than slog through the intricacies and trial and error of experimentation, he instead calls his buddy, a Redstone expert, to come set up the system for him. The buddy agrees, but only for the price of twenty gold bars (again, arbitrary). Project completed, Redstone works, buddy gets paid. With his new gold then, the buddy decides he wants to build a new test chamber for his experimentation, but doesn't want to physically hollow out an an entire mountain, so he then pays a different player (or perhaps a team who split the profits) to do it for him. This team them pays another character to add a pool to their house and the cycle continues.

    In these examples, both goods (1) and services (2) are traded with gold as the medium of exchange. Its power therefore, lies in its ability to be effectively traded for anything be it logs, diamonds or pools. If all players acknowledge and have faith in this purchasing power, then gold will function as a useful stand-in for straight barter method. This is exactly how paper currency functions in nations all over the world.
    Posted in: Survival Mode
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    posted a message on The Fed - Regulate your Minecraft Economy!
    :GoldBar: :GoldBar: :GoldBar:
    I had an idea similar to this one about using a gold based economy on large SMP servers. Since gold is a rare resource found in only 10 blocks out of every 10,000 (and then only at levels near the bedrock), it could be used as a currency, especially since its physical properties do give it any usefulness beyond decoration. (Though diamonds are rarer and could also be used as a form of current, they are exceedingly useful and desirable as crafting recipies and would such not accumulate or flow in a currency like manner). This uselessness works in favor of gold (both in bars and blocks) as a transferable form of currency.
    In a gold based currency system, players on an SMP server could mine for and find their own supplies of gold as well as trade for it. This would keep the economy robust as new sources of the mineral would be added everyday. With this supply, players could begin to trade gold for other desirable items, such as the begillion stacks of wood you need to build that awesome pirate ship.The trade for the payer selling the wood would not be for the gold itself, (unless he wants gold floors in his castle) he would then be able to use the gold to exchange for something else, like a few obsidian blocks to make a nether portal. Thus, with a large enough "economy" gold could function as a trade medium much like paper money does today, worthless in its own right, but given value by the population of the server who assign it a trade value.
    Benefits of working with a currency system:
    * Players can create their own business ventures, selling or trading materials to other players.
    * Wealth can be easily transported large distances by the player (i.e. carrying a stack of gold instead of 25 stacks of wood)
    * Resources can be invested, returned and reinvested, creating a dynamic economic atmosphere.
    *Medieval RPG servers get to have the gold coins they've always wanted

    As a last corollary to the OP: the "federal reserve system" you propose above would likely be too large and too unwieldy to implement in any minecraft server. Similarly, the use of currency (upon which any economy and reserve system is based) depends on a stable value and accessibility of the currency resource. There,fore, while pretty, the gold and diamond blocks you used to build the building are almost assuredly hacked in. For a currency system to work, NO ONE would be allowed to hack in any materials as this would upset the supply and demand balance and lead to a dysfunctional economy.
    :GoldBar: :GoldBar: :GoldBar:
    Posted in: Survival Mode
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    posted a message on Anybody Know What's Going On Here?
    What you are experiencing here is a terrestrial encounter with the Herbrine empire hailing from the Notch Galaxy. Using their interstellar light-stone ships, they bend space and time in order to instantly teleprot themselves to any location in the mineverse. This action while effective for travel, does have the side effect or reorganizing the molecular structure of any substance in the vicinity of their movements, which is your sky looks like its been painted gold by a spastic elephant. You should consider yourself honored by their presence in your puny little world, and if you know whats good for you you should go ahead and begin praying to the Herbrineian Pig God that all they need is directions.
    Posted in: Survival Mode
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